Fondren Fellows

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2021-22 Fondren Fellows

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Calista I. Ukeh

Topic:  Oral History Interviews and Archival Processing for the Task Force on Slavery, Segregation, and Racial Injustice (Mentors: Alex Byrd and Caleb McDaniel)

Bio: Calista Ukeh is a senior at Baker college  majoring in Social Policy Analysis with a double minor in Anthropology and Medical Humanities. She aims to provide an eclectic and multifaceted approach when conducting research on and documentation of the black experience, both historical and contemporary, within academia. Beyond the traditional structure of academic writing, Calista enjoys achieving this analysis through the use of (but not limited to):  music, short film, poetry, community conversations, photography, collage art.

 

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Katie Nguyen

Topic:  Oral History Interviews and Archival Processing for the Task Force on Slavery, Segregation, and Racial Injustice (Mentors: Alex Byrd and Caleb McDaniel)

Bio: Katie Nguyen is a senior majoring in Art History and Social Policy Analysis and from Sid Richardson College. Coming from St. Louis, Missouri, Katie has been dedicated to working for racial justice through the deconstruction of systemic oppression, state violence, and antiblackness. While at Rice, Katie has engaged with these issues by working directly in the Houston community to combat labor, resource, and social exploitation.

Juliana Phan

Juliana Phan

Topic:  The Sugar Land 95: Mapping Convict Leasing in Fort Bend County, 1865- 2018: A Continuation of the 2020-2021 Project (Mentor: Portia Hopkins )

Bio: Juliana Phan is a sophomore at Lovett majoring in Statistics and Social Policy Analysis with a minor in Data Science. She is passionate about racial justice and intersectional equality, and she wants to have a career in data analysis for a policy or advocacy group. Outside of school, she likes crocheting, drinking tea, catching up on the latest DC comics, and missing her home state, California.

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Grace Kneidel

Topic:  “Mapping the Reservation: Houston’s Red-Light District, 1908-1917” (Mentor: Brian Riedel)

Bio: Grace Kneidel is a junior from Brown College studying Spanish and Mathematical Economic Analysis.  This summer, under the guidance of Dr. Riedel, Grace began to study the political economy of the Reservation, Houston’s red light district from 1908-1917. As a Fondren Fellow, she is using ArcGIS to map land ownership in the Reservation by race over time. She is looking forward to improving her digital mapping skills and hopes to attend graduate school in Economics in the future.

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Maria Alejandra Mora

Topic:  Changing the Subject at Fondren Library (Mentor: Jeanette Sewall)                                                                                             

 

Sydney Hicks

Sydney Hicks

Topic:  Enhancing the Fondren Fellows Program (Mentor: Lisa Spiro)

Bio: Sydney Hicks is a Graduate student originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  pursuing a Master’s in Social Policy Evaluation. Her goal is to invoke change and foster environments for positive social impact. She is adamant about social policies impacting means of diversity and inclusion. As a Fondren Fellow, she examines how to enhance its communications, assessment methods, and support for fellows and mentors. Based on that analysis, she develop events, communication templates, guides, and other resources, while providing recommendations to improve the program. 

Madison Prause

Madison Prause

Topic:  Making Sense of Government Education Resources (Mentor: Anna Xiong and Erin Baumgartner)

Bio: Madison Prause carries strong knowledge of global affairs, international institutions, and education systems to the table. She is in her second year in the Master of Global Affairs Program at Rice University. She is highly adaptable in teaching international students domestically and abroad and has used the role as an ESL educator and Teach For America corps member to tackle education inequities in Houston and beyond. She is passionate about equitable education, cross-cultural learning, strengthening relationships among diverse and decision makers and education leaders, and extending educational opportunities to students globally.

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Arnav Sankaranthi 

Topic:  Translational Humanities for Public Health (Mentor: Kirsten Ostherr)

Bio: Arnav Sankaranthi is a junior at Brown College majoring in Biosciences with a concentration in Cell Biology and Genetics and minoring in Medical Humanities. He is planning on pursuing a career in medicine after graduation. In addition to working on Translational Humanities for Public Health, Arnav conducts cancer and neurodegenerative disease research at McGovern Medical School. He is interested in exploring how humanities-based approaches can be used to impact public health. Arnav’s current work involves curating global humanities approaches to the pandemic, conducting and publishing video interviews with professionals, and publicizing the website’s projects and resources to the broader community.

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Surabhi Madadi

Topic:  Translational Humanities for Public Health (Mentor: Kirsten Ostherr)

Bio: Surabhi is a senior undergraduate student originally from California. She is pursuing a major in Biosciences and a minor in Medical Humanities. Her work at a laboratory studying genetic models of ovarian function and with local organizations to promote reproductive cancer screenings has developed her interest in women’s health. She hopes to study the biopsychosocial factors of women’s health as a future medical student. As a Fondren Fellow, she aims to explore humanities-based interventions in the COVID-19 pandemic and in medicine at large.

Katelyn Laundry

Katelyn Landry

Topic: Where Is Texas on the SlaveVoyages Website? Reconstructing the Coastwise Traffic to the Lone Star State in the Nineteenth Century (Mentor: Daniel B. Domingues da Silva and Molly Morgan)

Bio: Katelyn Landry (she/her/ella) is a fourth-year undergraduate student majoring in history with minors in anthropology and Politics, Law and Social Thought (PLST). She is a member of theSlaveVoyages@Rice research team which aims to represent domestic coastwise voyages carrying enslaved people to Texas on the SlaveVoyages online database. She is also a senior fellow of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, which supports her ongoing research on public history and collective memories of slavery in Galveston, TX. An Austin, TX native with roots in the Rio Grande Valley, Katelyn grew up steeped in Tejano culture and popular Texan myths — she is now committed to reckoning with the state’s oft-overlooked history of slavery and racial violence.

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James Myers

Topic: Where Is Texas on the SlaveVoyages Website? Reconstructing the Coastwise Traffic to the Lone Star State in the Nineteenth Century (Mentor: Daniel B. Domingues da Silva and Molly Morgan)

Bio: K. James Tiéde-Myers is a Ph.D. candidate in History at Rice University. He is a member of the SlaveVoyages@Rice research team, which is adding the voyages that carried enslaved people to Texas to the SlaveVoyages website. His personal research focuses on how West African foodways were altered by the transatlantic slave trade and vice-versa. In turn, his dissertation shows how these modified foodways fundamentally reworked the social and economic structures of African and diasporic societies. Focusing on Lower Guinea and Jamaica,  Tiéde-Myers’ work ultimately shows how the politics of food and hunger shaped freedom and slavery in both Africa and the Caribbean during the Age of Revolutions.

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Victoria Zabarte

Topic: Where Is Texas on the SlaveVoyages Website? Reconstructing the Coastwise Traffic to the Lone Star State in the Nineteenth Century (Mentor: Daniel B. Domingues da Silva and Molly Morgan)

Bio: Victoria Zabarte is a fourth-year undergraduate student majoring in History and minoring in African and African American Studies. She is a member of the SlaveVoyages@Rice research team, which is adding the voyages that carried enslaved people to Texas to the SlaveVoyages website. Victoria's Honors History Thesis project, supplemented by the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, continues this research by analyzing these journeys, the evolution and distribution of the traffic, its organization, shippers, enslavers, and the demographics of the enslaved population brought to Texas in the coastwise trade. Her interests focus on the history of race and slavery in the Americas, particularly in the borderlands regions between Texas and Mexico. She hopes to further expand her research of these topics into the Caribbean in graduate school.

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Ben Schachter

Topic: Where Is Texas on the SlaveVoyages Website? Reconstructing the Coastwise Traffic to the Lone Star State in the Nineteenth Century (Mentor: Daniel B. Domingues da Silva and Molly Morgan)

Bio: Ben Schachter is a fourth-year undergraduate student majoring in History and Latin American Studies. He is a member of the SlaveVoyages@Rice research team which is working on adding voyages carrying enslaved people to Texas to the SlaveVoyages website. He is particularly interested in the history of slavery in the Americas, Rice's ties to slavery, and colonial Caribbean history. His current research uses microhistory methodologies to explore the effects of emancipation on the lives of people enslaved by the Rice family in Texas.

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Adrienne Rooney

Topic: Research by Members of the Racial Geography Project (Mentor: Fabiola López-Durán)

Bio: Adrienne Rooney (project manager) is a PhD Candidate in the department of art history. She studies twentieth-century art and visual culture in the Americas, with a focus on the Caribbean and the United States, as well as the intersections of race and space in the 20th century Atlantic World. She is the co-founder and co-organizer, with Dr. Fabiola López-Durán, of the Racial Geography Project.

Venus Alemanji

Venus Alemanji

Topic: Research by Members of the Racial Geography Project (Mentor: Fabiola López-Durán)                                                          

 

Marc Armena

Marc Armeña

Topic: Research by Members of the Racial Geography Project (Mentor: Fabiola López-Durán)

Bio: Marc Armeña is originally from Corpus Christi, Texas, but now resides in the family college at Hanszen. He studies Mechanical Engineering and Art History. As part of HART 315 last fall, he joined the Racial Geography Project convened and led by Dr. Fabiola López-Durán and PhD candidate Adrienne Rooney. His first strand of research examined histories of extraction and exploitation in the Louisiana timberlands owned by Rice University and their linkages to our campus. As a Fellow for this academic year, he will be conducting archival research through the Woodson Research Center to investigate the role of eugenics and the medicalization of racism in the first decades of the Rice Institute, the scholarship and instruction by eugenicists in the faculty, and its influence on the trajectory of the Institute's STEM-oriented development in later years.

Chaney Hill

Chaney Hill

Topic: Research by Members of the Racial Geography Project (Mentor: Fabiola López-Durán)

Bio: Chaney Hill is a 3rd year in the English, Ph.D. program at Rice. Her research interests include Critical Regionalism, American Literature of the South and of the West, Critical Texas Studies, and Public Memory Studies. As a Fondren Fellow, she is researching the connections between William Marsh Rice and the early Rice Institute Board of Trustees with the secessionist movement.

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Stephen Westich

Topic: Research by Members of the Racial Geography Project (Mentor: Fabiola López-Durán)

Bio: Stephen Westich is a Ph.D. candidate in the Art History department. He specializes in medieval architecture with a dissertation project focused on the Norwegian stave churches. He did his B.A. in art history at Wheaton College (IL) and, retaining an appetite for the world of images, followed that up with an M.A. in art history at Indiana University working with Prof. Diane Reilly on a thesis project looking at the use over time of certain motifs on the Gotlandic pictures stones. He conducts his current research under the advisement of Prof. Linda Neagley. Though he is a medievalist, he finds the study of how buildings produce spaces that bear ideological meanings both intriguing and important. Through this lens he is also doing research for the Racial Geography Project supported by the Fondren Fellows program, which will give him the chance to analyze these processes on the Rice campus.

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Hong-Ye Wang

Topic: Fondren Eco-Rep (Mentor: Lisa Spiro)